Write code that is easy to delete, not easy to extend.

“Every line of code is written without reason, maintained out of weakness, and deleted by chance” Jean-Paul Sartre’s Programming in ANSI C.

Every line of code written comes at a price: maintenance. To avoid paying for a lot of code, we build reusable software. The problem with code re-use is that it gets in the way of changing your mind later on.

The more consumers of an API you have, the more code you must rewrite to introduce changes. Similarly, the more you rely on an third-party api, the more you suffer when it changes. Managing how the code fits together, or which parts depend on others, is a significant problem in large scale systems, and it gets harder as your project grows older.

My point today is that, if we wish to count lines of code, we should not regard them as “lines produced” but as “lines spent” EWD 1036

If we see ‘lines of code’ as ‘lines spent’, then when we delete lines of code, we are lowering the cost of maintenance. Instead of building re-usable software, we should try to build disposable software.

I don’t need to tell you that deleting code is more fun than writing it.

To write code that’s easy to delete: repeat yourself to avoid creating dependencies, but don’t repeat yourself to manage them. Layer your code too: build simple-to-use APIs out of simpler-to-implement but clumsy-to-use parts. Split your code: isolate the hard-to-write and the likely-to-change parts from the rest of the code, and each other. Don’t hard code every choice, and maybe allow changing a few at runtime. Don’t try to do all of these things at the same time, and maybe don’t write so much code in the first place.

Source: Write code that is easy to delete, not easy to extend.